Can IBS Symptoms Be Controlled by Avoiding Certain Foods?

Please share this information.
Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Pin on Pinterest
Pinterest
Email this to someone
email
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Share on Reddit
Reddit

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a debilitating digestive condition with symptoms including bloating, gas, diarrhea, and constipation. Changes in bowel patterns are also quite common, as are abdominal pain and severe stomach cramps. IBS is an increasingly common disorder and is estimated to affect twenty percent of American adults, the majority being women of middle age.

Irritable bowel syndrome is the clinical term used currently for conditions that were once known as colitis, mucous colitis, spastic colon, spastic bowel, and functional bowel disorder.

Causes of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

The cause of irritable bowel syndrome is not completely understood. There are many possible factors including genetics, infection or trauma that have been shown to increase your risk for IBS. Symptoms often involve “disturbances in colonic motility” or severe abdominal muscle contractions combined with an increased sensitivity to food, gas, or stool in the bowel.

Trigger Foods And Irritable Bowel Syndrome

As the name suggests, trigger foods are specific food items that should be avoided by IBS patients. Trigger foods have a tendency to make the digestive tract become tense, inflamed, irritated and work abnormally.

Fats and oils. Some trigger foods are high in fat but low in fiber. Examples include creams, oils, poultry skins, coconut milk, and fried foods. IBS patients should avoid fatty foods as they reduce the rate by which the stomach digests food. Thus, fat allows intestinal bacteria more time to attack the sugars in digested food, which in turn raises the risk of producing high levels of intestinal gas much like fermentation. The presence of abnormally large amounts of intestinal gas triggers symptoms like bloating, constipation and diarrhea.

Caffeine. Foods with high levels of caffeine are also considered trigger foods. These include chocolate, carbonated drinks (colas and sodas) and coffee. Caffeine is a stimulant and can irritate the digestive tract, leading to symptoms being triggered and complicating IBS.

Gas producing foods. Gas producing beans, cabbage, nuts and broccoli. While these foods may increase bulk in the stool to help constipation, they also increase gas, bloating, and cramps.

Dairy products. Dairy products contain fat which can increase IBS symptoms. Secondly, many people with IBS are lactose intolerant. If you’re lactose intolerant and suffer doubly from gas, bloating and indigestion.

Gluten. Many people with IBS are also gluten intolerant or have a non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

Sugar-free sweeteners. These artificial sweeteners are known as sugar alcohols, or polyols. Polyols include sorbitol, xylitol, mannitol, and others. These sugar alcohols can trigger IBS symptoms because your body is unable to digest them.

Please share this information.
Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Pin on Pinterest
Pinterest
Email this to someone
email
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Share on Reddit
Reddit

Leave A Response »