Importance of Vitamin C in Your Diet

Please share this information.
Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Pin on Pinterest
Pinterest
Email this to someone
email
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Share on Reddit
Reddit

Vitamin C plays a variety of roles in how your body functions. Vitamin C is essential to immunity, iron absorption, building strong bones, wound healing, healthy skin, moderating blood pressure and sustaining eyesight. Vitamin C supports many chemical reactions, without which normal body functions begin to breakdown, exposing your body to disease.

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is a water-soluble vitamin which cannot be stored in or produced by your body. You must replenish Vitamin C levels daily through the foods you eat or through supplementation. Any excess amounts of vitamin C are frequently excreted from your body through your kidneys and urine, so it is necessary to replenish the body with vitamin C regularly.

One of the primary functions of Vitamin C is the formation of collagen. Collagen is a fibrous material contained within connective tissue, it gives our body form and supports tissue and organ repair. Collagen is found in cartilage, skin, bones, teeth, tendons, ligaments, fascia, organs and often between cells within your body. Vitamin C is an important and vital supplement needed for collagen formation that holds your body together.

Vitamin C helps your body absorb iron, preventing iron deficiency anemia. Vitamin C protects fat-soluble vitamins A and E and fatty acids from oxidation and also helps your body absorb calcium. Increasing your Vitamin C intake at the onset of a cold has been shown to reduce the severity of your cold symptoms by boosting your body’s immune response.

Vitamin C may increase the flexibility of your artery walls and increase urination, both actions have been shown to lower blood pressure in those with hypertension. Vitamin C promotes eye health and reduces the risk for age related macular degeneration and prevents the onset of cataracts. Vitamin C supports healthy wound healing, repairs burned tissue and stimulates bone formation.

Vitamin C is provided through a variety of fruits and vegetables including oranges, lemons, limes, grapefruits, watermelon, papaya, cantaloupe, grapes, strawberries, kiwi, mango, tomatoes, green peppers, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and kale. Vitamin C can be lost during the food preparation process like cooking or boiling. It is always best to consume your Vitamin C in its raw form. Once fruits or vegetables are cut, store them in sealed containers inside the refrigerator to minimize the loss of Vitamin C.

The recommended daily allowance for Vitamin C is 60-90 mg per day. Extreme Vitamin C deficiency can lead to a rare condition known as scurvy. Symptoms of scurvy include bleeding gums, loose teeth, easy bruising, poor healing, anemia, pain in joints and muscle wasting. Less extreme Vitamin C deficiency causes gallbladder disease, atherosclerosis, hypertension and stroke. Symptoms of Vitamin C deficiency include fatigue, depression, irritability, weight loss and lethargy.

While Vitamin C is water-soluble and most excess is flushed from your system, this doesn’t mean it should be taken in excess. Higher doses of Vitamin C are acceptable if you smoke or during times of fever or while fighting infection. However extended high doses of Vitamin C can cause stomach pain, diarrhea, nausea, an increased risk of kidney stones and back pain, fever, vomiting, headaches and rash.

Please share this information.
Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Pin on Pinterest
Pinterest
Email this to someone
email
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Share on Reddit
Reddit

Leave A Response »